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Data journals: types of peer review, review criteria, and editorial committee members’ positions
Sunkyung Seo, Jihyun Kim
Sci Ed. 2020;7(2):130-135.   Published online August 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.6087/kcse.207
  • 7,405 View
  • 163 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study analyzed the peer review systems, criteria, and editorial committee structures of data journals, aiming to determine the current state of data peer review and to offer suggestions.
Methods
We analyzed peer review systems and criteria for peer review in nine data journals indexed by Web of Science, as well as the positions of the editorial committee members of the journals. Each data journal’s website was initially surveyed, and the editors-in-chief were queried via email about any information not found on the websites. The peer review criteria of the journals were analyzed in terms of data quality, metadata quality, and general quality.
Results
Seven of the nine data journals adopted single-blind and open review peer review methods. The remaining two implemented modified models, such as interactive and community review. In the peer review criteria, there was a shared emphasis on the appropriateness of data production methodology and detailed descriptions. The editorial committees of the journals tended to have subject editors or subject advisory boards, while a few journals included positions with the responsibility of evaluating the technical quality of data.
Conclusion
Creating a community of subject experts and securing various editorial positions for peer review are necessary for data journals to achieve data quality assurance and to promote reuse. New practices will emerge in terms of data peer review models, criteria, and editorial positions, and further research needs to be conducted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dissemination effect of data papers on scientific datasets
    Hong Jiao, Yuhong Qiu, Xiaowei Ma, Bo Yang
    Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2024; 75(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • The data paper as a sociolinguistic epistemic object: A content analysis on the rhetorical moves used in data paper abstracts
    Kai Li, Chenyue Jiao
    Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2022; 73(6): 834.     CrossRef
  • Korean researchers’ motivations for publishing in data journals and the usefulness of their data: a qualitative study
    Jungyeoun Lee, Jihyun Kim
    Science Editing.2021; 8(2): 145.     CrossRef
An analysis of data paper templates and guidelines: types of contextual information described by data journals
Jihyun Kim
Sci Ed. 2020;7(1):16-23.   Published online February 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.6087/kcse.185
  • 6,823 View
  • 188 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Data papers are a promising genre of scholarly communication, in which research data are described, shared, and published. Rich documentation of data, including adequate contextual information, enhances the potential of data reuse. This study investigated the extent to which the components of data papers specified by journals represented the types of contextual information necessary for data reuse.
Methods
A content analysis of 15 data paper templates/guidelines from 24 data journals indexed by the Web of Science was performed. A coding scheme was developed based on previous studies, consisting of four categories: general data set properties, data production information, repository information, and reuse information.
Results
Only a few types of contextual information were commonly requested by the journals. Except data format information and file names, general data set properties were specified less often than other categories of contextual information. Researchers were frequently asked to provide data production information, such as information on the data collection, data producer, and related project. Repository information focused on data identifiers, while information about repository reputation and curation practices was rarely requested. Reuse information mostly involved advice on the reuse of data and terms of use.
Conclusion
These findings imply that data journals should provide a more standardized set of data paper components to inform reusers of relevant contextual information in a consistent manner. Information about repository reputation and curation could also be provided by data journals to complement the repository information provided by the authors of data papers and to help researchers evaluate the reusability of data.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dissemination effect of data papers on scientific datasets
    Hong Jiao, Yuhong Qiu, Xiaowei Ma, Bo Yang
    Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2024; 75(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Spectral Library of Plant Species from Montesinho Natural Park in Portugal
    Isabel Pôças, Cátia Rodrigues de Almeida, Salvador Arenas-Castro, João C. Campos, Nuno Garcia, João Alírio, Neftalí Sillero, Ana C. Teodoro
    Data.2024; 9(5): 65.     CrossRef
  • Korean scholarly journal editors’ and publishers’ attitudes towards journal data sharing policies and data papers (2023): a survey-based descriptive study
    Hyun Jun Yi, Youngim Jung, Hyekyong Hwang, Sung-Nam Cho
    Science Editing.2023; 10(2): 141.     CrossRef
  • The data paper as a sociolinguistic epistemic object: A content analysis on the rhetorical moves used in data paper abstracts
    Kai Li, Chenyue Jiao
    Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2022; 73(6): 834.     CrossRef
  • A Preliminary Analysis of Geography of Collaboration in Data Papers by S&T Capacity Index
    Pei‐Ying Chen, Kai Li, Chenyue Jiao
    Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2022; 59(1): 642.     CrossRef
  • Taxonomy 2.0: computer-aided identification tools to assist Antarctic biologists in the field and in the laboratory
    Thomas Saucède, Marc Eléaume, Quentin Jossart, Camille Moreau, Rachel Downey, Narissa Bax, Chester Sands, Borja Mercado, Cyril Gallut, Régine Vignes-Lebbe
    Antarctic Science.2021; 33(1): 39.     CrossRef
  • Korean researchers’ motivations for publishing in data journals and the usefulness of their data: a qualitative study
    Jungyeoun Lee, Jihyun Kim
    Science Editing.2021; 8(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Document Network and Conceptual and Social Structures of Clinical Endoscopy from 2015 to July 2021 Based on the Web of Science Core Collection: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(5): 641.     CrossRef
  • A Survey of Exclusively Data Journals and How They Are Indexed by Scientific Databases
    Kai Li, Chuyi Lu, Chenyue Jiao
    Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2021; 58(1): 771.     CrossRef
  • Three-stage publishing to support evidence-based management practice
    Juan A. Marin-Garcia
    WPOM-Working Papers on Operations Management.2021; 12(2): 56.     CrossRef
  • The role of the data paper in scholarly communication
    Chenyue Jiao, Peter T. Darch
    Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef

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